Hobbitul: O Calatorie Neasteptata (2012) Poster

Hobbitul: O Calatorie Neasteptata (2012)

  • Rate: 8.9/10 total 15,262 votes 
  • Genre: Adventure | Fantasy
  • Release Date: 14 December 2012 (Romania)
  • Runtime: 169 min
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Hobbitul: O Calatorie Neasteptata (2012)

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  • IMDb page: Hobbitul: O Calatorie Neasteptata (2012)
  • Rate: 8.9/10 total 15,262 votes 
  • Genre: Adventure | Fantasy
  • Release Date: 14 December 2012 (Romania)
  • Runtime: 169 min
  • Filming Location: Rock and Pillar Range, Otago, New Zealand
  • Director: Peter Jackson
  • Stars: Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen and Richard Armitage|See full cast and crew
  • Original Music By: Howard Shore   
  • Sound Mix: Dolby Digital | Datasat | SDDS
  • Plot Keyword: Hobbit | First Part | Prequel | Prequel To Best Picture Winner | Based On Novel

Writing Credits By:

  • Fran Walsh (screenplay) &
  • Philippa Boyens (screenplay) &
  • Peter Jackson (screenplay) &
  • Guillermo del Toro (screenplay)
  • J.R.R. Tolkien (novel "The Hobbit")

Known Trivia

  • This is not the first of Peter Jackson’s pet projects where he has asked Guillermo del Toro to direct; del Toro was also offered to helm the now troubled Halo movie, but he turned it down to direct his own pet project Hellboy II: The Golden Army. Del Toro did accept the chance to direct this film, but after years stuck in pre-production limbo, he left to pursue other projects.
  • Daniel Radcliffe, Shia LaBeouf, James McAvoy, Erryn Arkin and Tobey Maguire were considered for the role of Bilbo Baggins.
  • Bill Bailey auditioned for the role of Gloin. In Spaced he plays a character named Bilbo, named after this film’s title character.
  • Martin Freeman previously appeared in Politist meserias, which featured cameos by director Peter Jackson as “Santa Claus,” Cate Blanchett (Galadriel) as a CSI, and Bill Nighy (who played Sam Gamgee on BBC Radio) as a police officer. He also appeared in Shaun of the Dead, also opposite Nighy, as well as Penelope Wilton, who had been married to the previous Bilbo, Ian Holm.
  • This film was shot on thirty Red Epic cameras, the newest model of the Red Camera available at the time.
  • Ron Perlman was up for a role when Guillermo del Toro was set as director, but left after del Toro did as well.
  • This movie went through several stages of pre-production hell, including separate legal disputes between New Line Cinema, Peter Jackson and Tolkien’s estates which complicated production. When MGM finally moved the project forward in 2008 more complications ensued the when MGM entered bankruptcy and froze production, causing director Guillermo del Toro to step down after three years of pre-production. Later, it was almost cast out of New Zealand when several unions and guilds blacklisted the project and shooting was delayed again while Peter Jackson recovered from surgery from a perforated ulcer.
  • The name Beorn is an Old English word meaning bear. It is closely related to the common Scandinavian name Bjorn, also meaning bear. Both English and the Scandinavian languages such as Norwegian and Swedish are part of the same Germanic language family. Old English and Old Norse, their progenitor languages, were even closer.
  • Jed Brophy appears in this film as Nori. His son Sadwyn Brophy appeared as Eldarion in Stapanul Inelelor: Intoarcerea Regelui. Jed himself also appeared in Stapânul inelelor: Cele doua turnuri and Stapanul Inelelor: Intoarcerea Regelui as various Orcs.
  • Robert Kazinsky was cast as Fili and had filmed a few scenes, but left the project and returned to England about a month after filming started due to personal reasons. He was replaced by Dean O’Gorman.

Plot: A curious Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, journeys to the Lonely Mountain with a vigorous group of Dwarves to reclaim a treasure stolen from them by the dragon Smaug. Full summary »  »

Story: Bilbo Baggins is swept into a quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the fearsome dragon Smaug. Approached out of the blue by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo finds himself joining a company of thirteen dwarves led by the legendary warrior, Thorin Oakenshield. Their journey will take them into the Wild; through treacherous lands swarming with Goblins and Orcs, deadly Wargs and Giant Spiders, Shapeshifters and Sorcerers. Although their goal lies to the East and the wastelands of the Lonely Mountain first they must escape the goblin tunnels, where Bilbo meets the creature that will change his life forever … Gollum. Here, alone with Gollum, on the shores of an underground lake, the unassuming Bilbo Baggins not only discovers depths of guile and courage that surprise even him, he also gains possession of Gollum's "precious" ring that holds unexpected and useful qualities …Written by Production  

Synopsis

Synopsis: Local Shire hobbit Bilbo Baggins, uncle of Frodo Baggins, is living a quiet, peaceful life until Gandalf the Grey knocks on his door. A band of wandering dwarves shows up one or two at a time. The goal? To hire poor Bilbo for a quest (as a burgler) that entails defeating a dragon and recovering (burgling) a treasure. Along the way there are adventures with trolls and elves, a battle with goblins, the naming of Bilbo’s sword as Sting after a battle with some spiders, escaping from Wargs, and a barrel ride in a river. There is a great battle, The Battle of Five Armies, which includes men, dwarves, elves, goblins with Wargs, and more. Most importantly of all, part of this story leads Bilbo into Riddles in the Dark where he meets Gollum and in the process acquires a peculiar ring that has had and will have a great impact on the future of their world.

 

FullCast & Crew

Produced By:

  • Philippa Boyens known as co-producer
  • Carolynne Cunningham known as producer
  • Toby Emmerich known as executive producer
  • Callum Greene known as executive producer
  • Alan Horn known as executive producer
  • Peter Jackson known as producer
  • Ken Kamins known as executive producer
  • Eileen Morgan known as co-producer
  • Fran Walsh known as producer
  • Zane Weiner known as producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Ian McKellen known as Gandalf
  • Martin Freeman known as Bilbo
  • Richard Armitage known as Thorin
  • Ken Stott known as Balin
  • Graham McTavish known as Dwalin
  • William Kircher known as Bifur / Tom Troll
  • James Nesbitt known as Bofur
  • Stephen Hunter known as Bombur
  • Dean O'Gorman known as Fili
  • Aidan Turner known as Kili
  • John Callen known as Oin
  • Peter Hambleton known as Gloin / William Troll
  • Jed Brophy known as Nori
  • Mark Hadlow known as Dori / Bert Troll
  • Adam Brown known as Ori
  • Ian Holm known as Old Bilbo
  • Elijah Wood known as Frodo
  • Hugo Weaving known as Elrond
  • Cate Blanchett known as Galadriel
  • Christopher Lee known as Saruman
  • Andy Serkis known as Gollum
  • Sylvester McCoy known as Radagast
  • Barry Humphries known as Great Goblin
  • Jeffrey Thomas known as Thror
  • Michael Mizrahi known as Thrain
  • Lee Pace known as Thranduil
  • Manu Bennett known as Azog
  • Conan Stevens known as Bolg
  • John Rawls known as Yazneg
  • Stephen Ure known as Fimbul / Grinnah
  • Timothy Bartlett known as Master Worrywort
  • Bret McKenzie known as Lindir
  • Kiran Shah known as Goblin Scribe
  • Benedict Cumberbatch known as Necromancer
  • Glenn Boswell known as Dwarf Miner
  • Thomas Robins known as Young Thrain
  • Frazer Anderson known as Hunter Orc (uncredited)
  • Jarred Blakiston known as Musical Elf (uncredited)
  • Shane Boulton known as Rivendell Court Elf (uncredited)
  • Melanie Carrington known as Elf (uncredited)
  • Brendan Casey known as King Thranduil's Lieutenant (uncredited)
  • Renee Cataldo known as Goblin (uncredited)
  • Ray Henwood known as Net Mender (uncredited)
  • Katie Jackson known as Hobbit (uncredited)
  • Dean Knowsley known as Elven Guard (uncredited)
  • Tim McLachlan known as Goblin (uncredited)
  • Nathan Meister known as Goblin (uncredited)
  • Joseph Mika-Hunt known as Hunter Orc (uncredited)
  • Terry Notary known as Goblin (uncredited)
  • Thomas Rimmer known as Goblin (uncredited)
  • James Trevena-Brown known as Goblin (uncredited)
  • Mark Trotter known as Goblin (uncredited)

..

 

Supporting Department

Makeup Department:
  • Natalie Abizadeh known as prosthetics assistant
  • Georgia Allen known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Michele Barber known as hair stylist
  • Michele Barber known as makeup artist
  • Alice Baueris known as prosthetics assistant
  • Patrick Baxter known as prosthetic lab technician
  • Ricci-Lee Berry known as makeup artist
  • Don Brooker known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Katherine Brown known as key prosthetics technician
  • Anna de Witt known as hair stylist
  • Anna de Witt known as makeup artist
  • Rick Findlater known as key makeup and hair supervisor
  • Ryk Fortuna known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Katy Fray known as lead prosthetic makeup artist
  • Lucy Gargiulo known as additional makeup artist
  • C.J. Goldman known as prosthetic painter
  • Kala Harrison known as prosthetics assistant
  • Nancy Hennah known as hair stylist
  • Nancy Hennah known as makeup artist
  • Kerrin Jackson known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Paul Katte known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Marie Kealy known as prosthetics assistant
  • Peter King known as makeup and hair designer
  • Michael Krehl known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Davina Lamont known as workshop hair technician
  • Tami Lane known as prosthetics supervisor
  • Georgia Lockhart-Adams known as make up artist and hair stylist
  • Catherine Maguire known as hair and makeup artist
  • Zoe Marsden known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Renee McCarthy known as assistant makeup artist
  • Jaime Leigh McIntosh known as hair and makeup artist
  • Polly McKay known as prosthetics assistant
  • Heather McMullen known as prosthetics assistant
  • Flora Moody known as hair stylist
  • Flora Moody known as makeup artist
  • Richard Muller known as hair and make up artist
  • Hayley Ness known as additional makeup artist
  • Rachelle O'Donnell known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Matthew O'Toole known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Cristina Patterson Ceret known as contact lens painter
  • Michele Perry known as additional hair and makeup
  • Daniel Phillips known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Clare Ramsey known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Jess Reedy known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Sarah Rubano known as senior prosthetic makeup artist
  • Claire Rutledge known as makeup artist
  • Dara Wakely known as additional hair and makeup
  • Elka Wardega known as senior prosthetic makeup artist

Art Department:

  • Zahra Archer known as painter
  • Zahra Archer known as swing gang
  • Matt Austin known as key stand-by props
  • Martine Bairstow known as prop manufacturing coordinator
  • Andrew Baker known as designer: Weta Workshop
  • Simon Barker known as carpenter
  • Wayne D. Barlowe known as conceptual designer
  • Joshua Barraud known as assistant art director
  • Brett Blenkin known as construction manager
  • Garry Buckley known as conceptual model maker
  • Honoré Buisson known as figurative sculptor
  • Danny Caldwell known as leading hand
  • Steven Carroll known as set sculptor
  • Justin Chappell known as on-set stand-by carpenter
  • Vanessa Cole known as senior set decorating buyer
  • Genevieve Cooper known as stand-by painter
  • Michael Corcoran known as greens landscaper
  • Isadore William Crooks known as set designer
  • Colin Davidson known as construction manager
  • Darryn Grass Davies known as greensman
  • Nicole Day known as props painter
  • Hamish Drummond known as furniture maker
  • Joe Dunckley known as property master: Weta Workshop
  • W. Therese Eberhard known as props painting forman
  • Colin Elms known as on set dresser
  • Sean Golding known as foreman: prop painting
  • Rosie Guthrie known as set dresser (as Rose Guthrie)
  • Johnny Hawkins known as lead armour weapons stand-by
  • Spencer Chapman Hazel known as props painter
  • Guja Healy known as plasterer
  • Brendan Heffernan known as concept artist
  • Conor Heneghan known as furniture assistant
  • Chris Hennah known as art department manager
  • Jenny Hitchcock known as set designer
  • John Howe known as conceptual designer
  • Bill Hunt known as sculptor
  • Roland Hunter known as foreman: set finishing
  • Roland Hunter known as scenic artist foreman
  • Roman Illovsky known as equine horse make up artist
  • Roman Illovsky known as paint make-up
  • Trevor Kiely known as carpenter
  • David Kolff known as leadman
  • Alan Lee known as conceptual designer
  • Glenn Levy known as furniture maker
  • John Lott known as set designer
  • Simon Lowe known as key greens
  • Patrick Mabey known as furniture maker
  • Warren Mahy known as storyboard artist
  • Lance Marryatt known as furniture maker
  • Ben Mauro known as conceptual designer: Weta workshop
  • Margo Kaczynska McKenzie known as set finisher
  • Mike Mignola known as conceptual designer
  • Ryan Oliver known as greensman
  • Maria-Rose Payne known as props painter
  • Eduardo Pena known as concept designer
  • Daniel Reeve known as calligrapher
  • Matthew Rodgers known as conceptual designer: Weta Workshop
  • Jamie Scrafton known as furniture maker
  • Michael Smale known as assistant art director
  • Todd Smythe known as construction coordinator: Hobbiton
  • Nicole Spackman known as props stand-by assistant
  • Melissa Spicer known as assistant property master
  • Phil Staples known as furniture maker
  • Julian Steincke known as painter
  • Mark Stephen known as set designer
  • Paul Taylor known as carpenter
  • Phillip Telford known as laborer
  • Richard Thurston known as lead standby armor & weapons
  • Jack Tippler known as assistant art department coordinator
  • Paul Tobin known as concept designer
  • Gavin Urquhart known as set designer
  • Francisco Ruiz Velasco known as conceptual designer
  • Frank Victoria known as conceptual designer: Weta Workshop
  • Matt Ward known as set finisher
  • Gillian West-Walker known as set dresser
  • Megan Wilson known as head of engineering
  • Nadia M. known as conceptual designer (uncredited)

..

 

Company

Production Companies:

  • New Line Cinema
  • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)
  • WingNut Films
  • 3Foot7

Other Companies:

  • Abbey Road Studios  music recorded & mixed at
  • Background Talent  extras casting
  • Decca Records  soundtrack
  • Dolby Laboratories  sound mix (Dolby Atmos)
  • Ignition Print  poster design (uncredited)
  • London Philharmonic Orchestra  music performed by
  • Park Road Post  post-production facilities
  • Pinewood Shepperton  sound stages
  • Red Digital Cinema  camera equipment provided by
  • Scarlet Letters  end titles
  • Stone Street Studios  sound stages
  • WaterTower Music  soundtrack

Distributors:

  • Forum Hungary (2012) (Hungary) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. Entertainment (2012) (Canada) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. Pictures (2012) (USA) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2012) (Argentina) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2012) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2012) (Japan) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2012) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • Warner Bros. (2012) (Singapore) (theatrical)

..

 

Other Stuff

Special Effects:

  • 3ality Technica
  • Makeup Effects Group Studio
  • Sky Vega
  • Weta Digital
  • Weta Workshop

Visual Effects by:

  • Shaun Friedberg 'Pyrokinesis' known as animation technical director: Weta Digital
  • Seb Abante known as reference photographer: Weta Digital
  • David Abbott known as shader writer: Weta Digital
  • John Aberdein known as motion capture pipeline manager: Weta Digital
  • Glen Adlam known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Michael Aerni known as senior animator
  • Gerardo Aguilera known as visual effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Matt Aitken known as visual effects supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Anjel Alcaraz known as stereoscopic artist: Stereo D
  • Mark Edward Allen known as hair/fur artist (as Mark Allen)
  • Glenn Anderson known as programmer: Macintosh, Weta Digital
  • Chih-Jen Chang Andy known as compositor: weta digital
  • Karen Ansel known as digital artist
  • Christine Arboit known as lighting techical director: Weta Digital
  • Ryan Arcus known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Georgy Arevshatov known as senior texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Yalda Armian known as models production manager: Weta Digital
  • Nicole Ashford known as stereo matchmove artist
  • Kyle Ashley known as previsualization artist
  • Nicola Atkinson known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Derrick Auyoung known as animation technical director: Weta Digital
  • Carl Ayala known as camera technical director
  • Dan Ayling known as camera technical director
  • Sindharmawan Bachtiar known as creature pipeline technical director: Weta Digital
  • Jörg Baier known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Leslie Baker known as lighting technical director
  • Marco Barbati known as senior creature facial technical director: Weta Digital
  • Mark Barber known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Bryan Bartlett known as compositor: weta digital
  • Bryn Bayliss known as digital artist
  • Daniel Bayona known as matte painter: Weta Digital
  • Hamish Beachman known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Olivier Beierlein known as shader writer: Weta Digital
  • Brittany Bell known as visual effects
  • Kevin Bell known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Gregory Bellis known as camera td: Weta Digital
  • Daniel Bennett known as texture artist
  • Stephen Bennett known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Alex Berson known as digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Shweta Bhatnagar known as lead layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Graham Binding known as senior animator: Weta Digital
  • Robert Bloom known as lighting technical director
  • Sebastian Bommersheim known as senior digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Alessandro Bonora known as facial lead: Weta Digital
  • Jonathan Bot known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Shane Boulton known as motion capture actor
  • Adam Bradley known as senior digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Derek Bradley known as creature effects
  • Andre Brizard known as compositor: weta digital
  • Ryan Brooks known as rotoscope artist
  • Andrew D.W. Brown known as effects assistant technical director
  • Joerg Bruemmer known as digital compositor
  • Joerg W. Bungert known as digital colourist: Weta Digital
  • Andy Burmeister known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Alex Burt known as lead animator: Weta Digital
  • Julian R. Butler known as lead character setup
  • Sam Buys known as digital asset manager
  • Sam Buys known as visual effects: Weta Digital
  • Andreas Bystrom known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Miguel Diaz Cachero known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Regina Cachuela known as animation technical director
  • Djordje Cakovan known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Ben Campbell known as senior lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Jason Thomas Campbell known as creature assistant technical director
  • Cedric Canlas known as digital modeller: Weta Digital
  • Robin Stuart Cape known as rotoscope artist
  • Jeff Capogreco known as digital effects supervisor
  • Caleb Carr known as rotoscope artist
  • Taylor Carrasco known as animation technical director
  • Myriam Catrin known as senior texture artist
  • Arthur Chan known as rotoscope artist: Weta Digital
  • Johnny Chan known as motion capture
  • Leslie Chan known as digital artist
  • Jung Min Chang known as senior modeller: Weta Digital
  • Matthieu Chardonnet known as senior effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Peter Chen known as animator
  • Jason K.S. Cheung known as production engineer: Weta Digital
  • Gak Gyu Choi known as modeller: Weta Digital
  • Jong Jin Choi known as digital artist
  • Adam Christensen known as render wrangler
  • Ria-Bella Chua known as rotoscope artist: Weta Digital
  • Jasper Chung known as rotoscope artist
  • Julia Jooyeon Chung known as previs artist
  • Matthew Cioffi known as senior facial modeler
  • Craig D. Clarke known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • David Clayton known as animation supervisor: weta digital
  • Mike Clephane known as digital modeller: Weta Digital
  • Emma Clifton known as compositor: Weta Digital
  • Sam Cole known as digital compositor: visual effects: Weta Digital
  • Zachary Cole known as compositor
  • Shane Cook known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Vernessa Cook known as motion editor
  • Gemma Cooper known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Shane Cooper known as software developer
  • Brenton Cottman known as lead matte painter
  • Andrei Coval known as facial modeler: weta digital
  • Louis Cox known as camera technical director
  • Christine Cram known as digital paint artist
  • Doug Cram known as digital compositor
  • Jim Croasdale known as senior paint artist
  • Ryan Cronin known as animator: Weta Digital
  • Steve Cronin known as senior compositor: Weta Digital
  • Nicholas Cross known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Christopher Crouzet known as character technical director: Weta Digital
  • Noemie Cruciani known as senior paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Aaron Cubis known as visual effects editor: Weta Digital Ltd
  • Alexia Cui known as lighting technical director
  • Glenn Curry known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Ken Dackermann known as digital compositor
  • Marion Davey known as previs production manager: Weta Digital
  • Ana Mestre de Almeida Pereira known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Daphne De Jesus known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Sarah de Schot known as digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Paul Debevec known as research & development
  • Tamir Diab known as lighting technical director
  • Sylvan Dieckmann known as lighting technical director
  • Jennifer Docherty known as creatures production manager: Weta Digital
  • Jonny Doig known as sequence manager: Weta Digital
  • Samuel Doyle known as lead texture artist
  • Nebojsa Dragosavac known as software developer
  • Georg Duemlein known as effects technical director
  • Ryan Duhaime known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Georgia Dumergue known as roto and paint artist
  • Shawn Dunn known as head of layout/animation technologies: Weta Digital
  • Amanda Dyar known as visual effects
  • Tim Ebling known as visual effects: Weta Digital
  • Areito Echevarria known as lead effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Austin Eddy known as senior animator: Weta Digital
  • Samuel Edwards known as technical director: Weta Digital
  • Jack Elder known as research and development
  • Kane Elferink known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Daniel Elliott known as visual effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Joe Engelke known as digital compositor
  • Kevin Estey known as previsualization artist
  • Gianpietro Fabre known as previs artist: Weta Digital
  • Luca Fascione known as rendering research lead
  • Dan Feinstein known as digital compositor: Weta
  • Oliver Ferguson known as visual effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Florian Fernandez known as lead modeler: Weta Digital
  • Matt Fitzgerald known as digital modeler
  • Jason Fleming known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Matthew Fogarty known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Ben Folkman known as senior previs artist: Weta Digital (as Benjaman Folkman)
  • Nicola Fontana known as digital artist: Weta Digital
  • Chris Foreman known as senior effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Michael Forot known as creatures R&D TD
  • Ludovic Fouche known as camera td
  • Migael Franken known as rotoscope artist
  • Rod Fransham known as motion technical director
  • Guillaume François known as senior shader writer
  • Johan Fröjd known as motion editor: Weta Digital
  • Alex Funke known as motion control supervisor
  • Jason Galeon known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Robb Gardner known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Nicholas Gaul known as senior modeler: Weta Digital
  • Mark Gee known as digital effects supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Christoph Genzwürker known as motion capture software developer
  • Storm Gezentsvey known as compositor
  • Jen Gillespie known as technology coordinator: Weta Digital
  • Geoffroy Givry known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Evgeny Glazyrin known as technical director
  • Melissa Goddard known as digital compositor
  • Melissa Goddard known as senior paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Peter Godden known as layout artist
  • Peter Godden known as matchmove artist
  • Marcus Goodwin known as visual effects production manager: weta digital
  • Anna-Louise Gordon known as visual effects producer
  • Jason Grindlay known as tech support
  • Nicholas Grobler known as lighting assistant technical director: Weta Digital
  • Martin Groezinger known as senior technical director: Weta Digital
  • Signy Bjorg Gudlaugsdottir known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Bassim Haddad known as senior motion editor
  • Mark Haenga known as lead facial modeler
  • Faraz Hameed known as senior previz animator: Weta Digital
  • Éric Hamel known as matte painter: Weta Digital
  • Bryant Hardwick known as texture/look dev artist
  • Yoshihiro Harimoto known as creature technical director: Weta Digital
  • Adam Harriman known as on-set surveyor: Weta Digital
  • Toby Haruno known as senior character animator: Weta Digital
  • Serena Hastie known as rotoscope artist: Weta Digital
  • Martin Haughey known as previs animator
  • Mark Hawthorne known as visual effects editor
  • Kelly Haysom known as digital paint artist: Weta Digital Ltd
  • Nicole Hekel known as digital artist
  • Quentin Hema known as digital paint supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Allan Henderson known as modeller
  • Rachel Herbert known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Dean Hewison known as digital asset coordinator: weta digital
  • Matthew Hicks known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Christian Hipp known as software developer: Weta Digital
  • Robin Hollander known as compositing supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Matt Holmes known as supervising VFX editor
  • Teijo Holzer known as production engineer: weta digital
  • Tom Holzinger known as lead motion editor: Weta Digital
  • Teresa Hooper known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Sandy Houston known as rotoscoping supervisor
  • Jason Lei Howden known as rotoscope and digital paint artist: Weta Digital (as Jason Howden)
  • Victor Huang known as previsualization animator: Weta Digital
  • Alwyn Hunt known as senior texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Megan Hutchison known as digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Rachel Hydes known as motion capture tracker
  • Anthony Jacob known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Ebrahim Jahromi known as creature technical director: Weta Digital
  • Malik Jayawardena known as motion capture technical director
  • Carolina Jiménez known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Kenneth Johansson known as modeller: Weta Digital
  • Michael Johns known as render wrangler: Weta Digital
  • Nathan Johnson known as lighting technical director
  • Gios Johnston known as senior creature technical director
  • Danny Jones known as senior roto/paint artist
  • Kory Juul known as compositor: Weta Digital
  • Jens Kafitz known as senior texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Joshua Kamau known as rotoscope artist
  • Jason Kane known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Miae Kang known as lead lighting TD: Weta Digital
  • Mike Kelly known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Kevin Kelm known as creature technical director: Weta Digital
  • Christian Kesler known as matte painter: Weta Digital
  • Helen Khrustalyova known as visual effects artist
  • Christian Kickenweitz known as motion editor
  • Sigtor Kildal known as motion capture technical director: Weta Digital
  • Ben Kilgore known as senior creature technical director
  • Adam King known as lead lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Oliver Kirchhoff known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Balazs Kiss known as lead lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • John Kitching known as compositor: weta digital
  • Makoto Koyama known as senior animator: Weta Digital
  • Jakub Krajcovic known as systems engineer
  • Alex Kramer known as senior camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Lars Kramer known as camera technical director
  • Szczepanski Krzysztof known as previsualization artist
  • Dave Kujawski known as production engineer: Weta Digital
  • Martin Kulig known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Jerry Kung known as previsualization animator: Weta Digital
  • Todd Labonte known as senior animator: Weta Digital
  • Keith Lackey known as technical director: Weta Digital
  • Kosta Lagis known as visual effects artist
  • Juan Pablo Lampe known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Marc Landrain known as camera technical director
  • Michael Lanzensberger known as senior compositor
  • Luisma Lavin known as lead motion editor: Weta Digital
  • Ken Lee known as texture artist
  • Sun Jin Lee known as digital artist: modeler
  • Iva Lenard known as senior reference photographer
  • Fabio Leporelli known as shaders look development
  • Merlin Lepper known as previs artist
  • Steve Lesser known as software developer
  • Joe Letteri known as visual effects supervisor
  • Dean Lewandowski known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Carlos Lin known as creature technical director
  • Eung Ho Lo known as modeler and hair/fur artist: Weta Digital
  • Thomas Sing Wai Lo known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Zachary Lo known as compositor: Weta Digital
  • Jason Locke known as camera technical director
  • Morgan Loomis known as senior animator
  • Jade Lorier known as facial motion editor
  • Ruth-Anne Loveridge known as cg modeler
  • Matt Lumb known as lighting assistant technical director
  • Wan-Chun Alex Ma known as research and development: Weta Digital
  • Daniel Macarin known as CG supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Sam Maclennan known as wrangler coder: Weta Digital
  • Jason Madigan known as digital compositor
  • Daisuke Maki known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Samuel Maniscalco known as lighting assistant technical director
  • Paul Maples known as motion control operator
  • Jason Marlow known as camera technical director
  • Jan Maroske known as compositor: Weta Digital
  • Kirk Mawhinney known as facial modeler
  • Neil Mayo known as editorial team: Weta Digital
  • David McCormick known as creatures software developer
  • Brad McFlinn known as rotoscope artist
  • Bradley McFlinn known as rotoscope artist
  • Dave McGrath known as visual effects: Weta Digital
  • Jeremy McKenzie known as layout technical director: Weta Digital (as Jeremy Ball)
  • Richard McKenzie known as render wrangler: Weta Digital
  • Chloe McLean known as facial motion editor
  • Donal McMullan known as production engineer
  • Renton McNeill known as production engineer: Weta Digital
  • Louise McNicholl known as layout department manager: Weta Digital
  • Mark McNicholl known as lead lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Gagan Mehta known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Miklós Mesterházy known as lighting technical director: Weta
  • Jessica Millar known as senior technical director: lighting
  • Seth F. Miller known as digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Mo Mohamoud known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Alberto Montañés known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Steven Morgan-Hastie known as rotoscope artist: Weta Digital
  • Simon Dean Morley known as production engineer
  • Bo Mosley known as environment artist: Weta Digital
  • Daniel Moy known as digital artist
  • Alessandro Mozzato known as CG supervisor
  • Matt Mueller known as senior reference photographer
  • Rolf Muetze known as lighting technical director
  • Rolf Muetze known as visual effects: Weta Digital
  • Nicky Muir known as animation production manager
  • Arwen Munro known as vfx production manager: Weta Digital
  • Vanessa Mylchreest known as visual effects artist
  • Dominica Myles known as stereo matchmove artist
  • Alfred Mürrle known as compositing supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Leo Neelands known as digital compositor
  • Wolfgang Niedermeier known as camera lead: Weta Digital
  • Ben Nightingale known as senior texture artist/look dev: Weta digital
  • Espen Nordahl known as shader writer: Weta Digital
  • Sam Norman known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Greg Notzelman known as texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Alexander Nowotny known as senior effects technical director: Weta Digital (as Alex Nowotny)
  • Brian Nugent known as compositor
  • James Ogle known as lead digital modeler
  • Ray Ooi known as digital paint artist
  • David A. Ostler known as lead lighting technical director
  • Amanda Pamela known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Sathyan Panneerselvam known as animator: Weta Digital
  • Sathyan Panneerselvam known as previsualization artist
  • John Papafotiou known as lighting technical director
  • Jonathan Paquin known as animator: Weta Digital
  • Hunter Parks known as shader writer
  • Patrick Peterson known as layout technical director
  • Ignacio B. Peña known as previsualization artist
  • David Phillips known as senior compositor
  • Jeremy Pickett known as CG supervisor
  • Carles Piles known as texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Bruno Pollet known as motion editor
  • James Porter known as camera technical director
  • Christian Poullay known as camera td: Weta Digital
  • Sam Prebble known as creature assistant technical director: Weta Digital
  • Thomas Prebble known as information systems: Weta Digital
  • Eddy Purnomo known as effects technical director: Weta Digital
  • Simon Quach known as motion editor: Weta Digital
  • Cesar Quijada known as senior digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Ula Rademeyer known as lead texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Paul Raeburn known as digital compositor
  • Pascal Raimbault known as lead modeler: Weta Digital
  • Kade Ramsey known as rotoscope artist: Weta Digital
  • Troy Ramsey known as senior paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Ellen Rappenecker known as lead facial motion editor: Weta Digital
  • Craig Douglas Rattray known as rotoscope artist: Weta Digital
  • Paul Redican known as senior compositor
  • Chris Reece known as systems developer
  • Markus Reithoffer known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Marco Revelant known as models supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Nicholas Richter known as motion editor
  • Christian Rivers known as pre-visualization supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Ben Roberts known as compositing supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Cesar Rodriguez Bautista known as senior paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Ryan Rogers known as lead lighting technical director
  • Sharuddin Rosunally known as compositing production manager: Weta Digital
  • Jance Rubinchik known as lead animator: Weta Digital
  • Jesús Ruiz Torres known as motion editor
  • Garry Runke known as lead effects technical director
  • Kristina Russo known as digital artist: Weta Digital
  • Eric Saindon known as visual effects supervisor
  • Christoph Salzmann known as compositing supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Alessandro Saponi known as lead lighting
  • Horst Sarubin known as motion control camera operator
  • Caterina Schiffers known as texture artist: Weta digital
  • Jennifer Schoo known as senior software developer
  • Marcus Schoo known as software developer
  • Florian Schroeder known as compositing supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Andreas Schuster known as technical director: Weta Digital
  • Carsten Seller known as animator
  • Paolo Emilio Selva known as software developer: Weta Digital
  • Paul Seyb known as visual effects
  • Amir Shachar known as shader development: Weta Digital
  • Marnie Shachar known as texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Thrain Shadbolt known as CG supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Sam Sharplin known as senior digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Aurynn Shaw known as production engineer: Weta Digital
  • Adam Shelton known as textures pipeline technical director: Weta Digital
  • Kevin L. Sherwood known as visual effects producer
  • Tomoko Shin known as compositor
  • Chrystia Siolkowsky known as roto artist
  • Anna Sitjà known as texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Brett Skinner known as senior texture and look dev artist
  • Eván Skíbin known as wrangler
  • Matt Sloan known as visual effects
  • Lori Smallwood known as senior animation technical director
  • Cole Smith known as models coordinator
  • Kevin Andrew Smith known as visual effects supervisor: second unit
  • Marc Smith known as camera TD: Weta Digital
  • Eva Snyder known as digital compositor: visual effects: Weta Digital
  • Sean Snyders known as senior mocap engineer
  • Perry Hyunwoo Sohn known as camera technical director: Weta Digital
  • Michael Solon known as paint artist
  • Na Song known as digital modeler: weta digital
  • Eddie Soria known as digital painter
  • Gerrard Southam known as previsualisation artist
  • Jonas Sperl known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Melissa Spicer known as production coordinator: weta digital
  • Marco Spitoni known as previs animator
  • Mark Stanger known as animator
  • Albrecht Steinmetz known as camera lead: Weta Digital
  • Jacob Stephens known as lead layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Alice Sterre known as rotoscoping
  • John Stevenson-Galvin known as senior digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Matteo Stirati known as modeller: Weta Digital
  • Justin Stockton known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Rosalind Stratton known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Francois Sugny known as visual effects artist
  • Ben Swinbanks known as stereoscopic motion tracker
  • Raqi Syed known as senior technical director: lighting
  • Giuseppe Tagliavini known as lead compositor: Weta Digital
  • Reynold Tagore known as texture artist/look dev
  • Hirofumi Takeda known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Eric Tang known as lead creature technical director: Weta Digital
  • Andrew Taylor known as shader writer: Weta Digital (as Andrew R. E. Taylor)
  • Bridget M. Taylor known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Sompong Teekasathien known as digital modeller: Weta Digital
  • Sunny Teich known as senior creature technical director
  • Felix Telfer known as effects assistant technical director
  • Chris Templeman known as rotoscope artist
  • Tim Teramoto known as creature technical director
  • Kieran Tether known as lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Amy Thomas known as lead assistant technical director
  • Gareth Thomas known as rotoscope artist
  • Shannon Thomas known as senior modeler: Weta Digital
  • Ben Thompson known as lead lighting td: Weta Digital
  • Caleb Thompson known as digital compositor
  • Pär Tingström known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Audrea Topps Harjo known as creatures production manager: WETA Digital
  • Daniele Tosti known as CG supervisor
  • Mariko Tosti known as shader department manager
  • Mark Victor Trappett known as render technical assistant
  • Wayne Traudt known as technical director
  • Diego Trazzi known as lead fx: Weta Digital
  • Jon Tyler known as build lead: Weta Digital
  • James Van Der Reyden known as motion capture technical director: Weta Digital
  • Phil Van Der Reyden known as modeler
  • Chris Van Dyck known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Beck Veitch known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Armando Velazquez known as digital compositor
  • Douglas Peter Viljoen known as rotoscope artist
  • Andreja Vuckovic known as modeler: Weta Digital
  • Reed Wade known as production engineer
  • Chris Walker known as lighting technical director: weta digital
  • Sean Noel Walker known as lead lighting technical director
  • Faye Walkington known as motion editor
  • Brenda R. Wallace known as production engineer
  • Tim Ward known as lighting technical director
  • Ryan Ware known as lighting assistant technical director
  • Ben Warner known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Shraga Weiss known as facial modeler
  • Pete Wellington known as information systems: Weta Digital
  • Diana Marie Wells known as digital painter
  • Kenneth Wells known as technical support: Weta Digital
  • R. Christopher White known as visual effects supervisor: Weta Digital
  • Tobias Wiesner known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Fraser Wilkinson known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Gavin Williams known as motion editor: Weta Digital
  • James Willingham III known as previsualization artist
  • Nicholas Wilson known as senior digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Stephen Wilson known as digital compositor: Weta digital
  • Garrett Winters known as layout technical director: Weta Digital
  • Paul Marcus Wong known as assistant lighting technical director: Weta Digital
  • Roger Wong known as creature technical director: Weta Digital
  • Clare Woodford-Robinson known as digital modeler: Weta Digital
  • Piotr Fox Wysocki known as senior texture r&d and look dev artist
  • Xian Xiao known as software developer
  • Junying Xu known as texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Casey Yahnke known as senior digital paint artist: Weta Digital
  • Kareem Yassih known as IT production manager
  • Kelvin Yee known as digital compositor: Weta Digital
  • Rayeon Yeem known as digital paint artist: Weta Digtal
  • Viki Yeo known as senior texture artist: Weta Digital
  • Dennis Yoo known as lead animator: Weta Digital
  • Craig Young known as animator: Weta Digital
  • Elliott Young known as senior analyst programmer: Weta Digital
  • Joyce Young known as lighting technical director: weta digital
  • Chris Zammit known as senior texture artist/look dev: Weta digital
  • Marzena Zareba known as on-set vfx, vfx data wrangler: Weta Digital
  • Marzena Zareba known as vfx artist: matchmover: Weta Digital
  • Matthias Zeller known as lead creature technical director: Weta Digital
  • Mohand Zennadi known as senior technical director: lighting
  • Daniel Zettl known as senior animator: Weta Digital
  • Brandon Davis known as effects technical director (uncredited)
  • Allan Henry known as motion capture performer (uncredited)

Release Date:

  • New Zealand 28 November 2012 (Wellington) (premiere)
  • Belgium 12 December 2012
  • Denmark 12 December 2012
  • Finland 12 December 2012
  • France 12 December 2012
  • Netherlands 12 December 2012
  • New Zealand 12 December 2012
  • Norway 12 December 2012
  • South Africa 12 December 2012
  • Sweden 12 December 2012
  • Argentina 13 December 2012
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina 13 December 2012
  • Chile 13 December 2012
  • Croatia 13 December 2012
  • Czech Republic 13 December 2012
  • Germany 13 December 2012
  • Greece 13 December 2012
  • Hong Kong 13 December 2012
  • Hungary 13 December 2012
  • Ireland 13 December 2012
  • Israel 13 December 2012
  • Italy 13 December 2012
  • Philippines 13 December 2012
  • Portugal 13 December 2012
  • Serbia 13 December 2012
  • Singapore 13 December 2012
  • Slovakia 13 December 2012
  • Slovenia 13 December 2012
  • South Korea 13 December 2012
  • Thailand 13 December 2012
  • UK 13 December 2012
  • United Arab Emirates 13 December 2012
  • Brazil 14 December 2012
  • Bulgaria 14 December 2012
  • Canada 14 December 2012
  • Colombia 14 December 2012 (Bogotá) (premiere)
  • Estonia 14 December 2012
  • India 14 December 2012
  • Japan 14 December 2012
  • Lithuania 14 December 2012
  • Mexico 14 December 2012
  • Paraguay 14 December 2012
  • Romania 14 December 2012
  • Spain 14 December 2012
  • Taiwan 14 December 2012
  • Turkey 14 December 2012
  • USA 14 December 2012
  • Armenia 19 December 2012
  • Russia 19 December 2012
  • Ukraine 20 December 2012
  • Australia 26 December 2012
  • Iceland 26 December 2012
  • Poland 28 December 2012

MPAA: Rated PG-13 for extended sequences of intense fantasy action violence, and frightening images

..

 
 

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database

   
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Posted on December 14, 2012 by admin in Movies | Tags: , , .

10 Comments

  1. chapy004 from United States
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    Best of the best. Pete has crafted a masterpiece. I should say at thispoint, I am a new fan of LOTR movies after seeing this movie. Myfriends and family always told me I should watch the previous 3 filmsand now i cant wait to sit down with a bowl of popcorn and witness themagnificent scale and perfect execution that The Hobbit: an UnexpectedJourney brought to all 5 senses of mine. Maybe I could count The Hobbitin as a SIXTH sense. It was just THAT good.

    First of all, the 48fps was just beautifully sharp and clean to theeyes. It was a touch of technological wizardry by Jackson, and itworked perfectly, allowing the viewer to feel as he/she were a spyingpicture frame on Bilbo's fireplace, or a pine tree looking over a cliffand down at Rivendell. It seems far fetched, but lets just say I forgotI was watching a movie, and you can experience for yourself, what Imean.

    The execution was fabulous as well; the pacing, the shot angles, theacting, the script, and so much more. The score by Howard Shore was soclever and is sure to put a smile on your face. The WHOLE movie willput a smile on your face. The Hobbit will remind you that you can dogreat things, no matter how small.

  2. sbalkam from Washington, DC
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    The movie is amazing. It is unlike anything I've ever experienced in acinema. The vividness of the colors and light and movement is somethingto behold. And then the 3D takes it all to another level. It was alittle unnerving at times. Almost as if I was watching a hybrid of amovie and a live action performance.

    The scenery is, of course, gorgeous. The acting is light, fun, playfulwhile also managing to stay true to the original story. There is alittle too much of the side stores for my liking. And it could wellhave been cut by a half hour or so and still not lost any of it impactand appeal.

    Martin Freeman is a revelation. Knowing him from The Office (I lived inthe UK for a while) it hardly seemed plausible that he could carry offsuch a role, but he is very believable. The merry band of dwarfs arewell played and you somehow get to know each of them by the end of thefilm. The special effects are, well, special. We were ducking as rocksand boulders came flying out at us and I swear there was a birdfloating over our heads at one point. The surround sound was rich andevocative of the caves and the music is lush and emotional.

    As for the main story, well, apart from doing a prelude that reprisesthe role of Frodo and older Bilbo Baggins, it pretty much stays true tothe text – with some audience members anticipating what the characterswere going to say next.

    A word of warning – some of the battle scenes are very intense, mademore so by the 3D and high definition used along with the soundeffects. You may want to think long and hard about taking young kids toit.

    But for everyone else, particularly the young at heart, this firstinstallment of The Hobbit is a gem.

    (note: I was very fortunate to see The Hobbit in Wellington last week.I was there on business and through a friend of a friend I landed aticket. I was in in Cinema 1 of the Reading Cinemas – one of the twocinemas that premiered the film last Wednesday.)

  3. baron_genitalstrassen from Gerst
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    Some love stories are built on passion, some on courage and some onhope. Very rarely do you come across a love story that encompassesitself around a journey. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey introducesus to the world of Bilbo Baggins, who mirrors the most innocent ofsentiments which lie locked up within the depths of our heart. He winsus over in the first frame, because he is one among us. It is not hisheroism which makes him surreal, but his vulnerability which makes himendear-able. The audience falls in love with Bilbo because he is scaredof the unknown just like us. What makes him a hero is his convictionand spirit, which makes him embark on a wide-spread journey for thesearch of love and faith. It is somewhere in that journey, that you nolonger root for Peter Jackson and his victory, but for Bilbo and hisbelief, which makes The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey a winner rightfrom the opening credits.

    His name is Bilbo, Bilbo Baggins. Brought up in an unforgiving society,Bilbo battles the alternate evils of racial profile and scornful peerswith equal focus, trying to make sense of the world that burns homes,bullies people at school and make a false show of sympathy. He goes bythe doctrine of Gandalf the Grey, who teaches him that there are twoclasses of people in the world, those who are good and would offer alollipop and those who are bad and would point a sharp stick. There isno caste, creed or religion but just people who shape the world. It isthis philosophy which Bilbo carries forward in his love and faith,painting his journey in a collage of alternate light and dark emotions,shadow plays of human nature which guides him to the world or perhaps,guides the world towards him.

    The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is appreciable because of itsbrilliance, acceptable for its nobility and unquestionable in itsintegrity. Peter Jackson weaves in a tale of love, faith, strength andhumanity within a cinematic frame of timeless minutes pulling out ariveting and compelling human drama of innocence poised against thesystem, through the filtered sensibilities of a patient suffering fromthe effects of an enchanter's ring, one who cannot understand theworld, but love it enough to change it. The keynotes of each frame,drenched with subtle social comments and complex emotional undertonesmakes the movie an amalgamation of the colors of hope and persistence,with layered textures of unspoken bonds. With Bilbo, Jackson succeedsin bringing the system on trial through the eyes of one who cannot biashimself on any ideology, making his emotions pure and though provoking,which touches the innermost chords of the heart, moistening the eyesand serenading the senses.

    The story is filled with emotional subtexts which move at breakneckspeed throughout the length of the film, constantly switching gearsbetween the palettes of emotions. The dialogs exude class andconfidence holding grip of the story yet laced with the finesse thatallows for emotional drama combined with spiritual uprising, casting asatire on the entire system and its treatment of identities. The scriptpenned by Fran Walsh is one of par excellence, allowing the audience toblend into Bilbo through his smiles and tears , laugh in his joy andcringe with every blow dealt to him. The screenplay drops hypocriticalmoral ambitions to make scathingly relevant comments on modern outlookof the world, making it rise several notches above anything attemptedin modern-day Hollywood.

    In the end, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey becomes the experience itis because of Bilbo and Gandalf, essayed flawlessly by Freeman andMcKellen. Freeman exudes the spirit of Bilbo in every breath and pulseof the film, putting in a performance that is beyond any benchmark ofexcellence. He controls every single emotional nerve of the audiencewith vacant stares and dimpled smiles, towering like an illusionistconjuring up a magical performance of a lifetime. He breaks everystereotypical mould attached to him to rise like a phoenix from theashes with Bilbo , who reigns over the audience in a sweeping wave ofemotions, establishing a bond that scales beyond the arc-lights of the70mm screen. He is complimented by Thorin whose very presence lights upthe entire room with just a flashing smile. He balances the sensitivityof love and charm with the emotional conflict of a ravaged heart witheffortless poise. The interactions between Freeman and his merrycompany form the highlights of the film, filled with the cacklingchemistry of a uninhibited passion, captivating the audience in themesmerizing spell of the couple. Elijah Wood as Bilbo's nephew deliversa matured and restrained performance while Hugo Weaving as Eldronblends in simplicity with sensibility in a performance that comesstraight from the heart. Benedict Cumberbatch is exceptional as theyoung Sauron in his mannerisms while the supporting cast all delivercredible performances including Ian Holm in a dazzling cameo.

    There will always be movies that enchant us with their magic, but therewill hardly be a journey that goes beyond cinematic borders to deliverthe experience of a lifetime. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey isundoubtedly the new face of global cinema that enthralls with eachpassing frame, healing the hidden scars of the heart with its messageof a better and humane world. There might be superheroes, but therewill never be one Bilbo Baggins, who takes pride in being ordinary andyet changes the face of his world.

    Earlier time scales used B.C. and A.D. to mark important events. After14th December 2012, the scales of humanity would mark the world beforeand after the release of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

    My Rating- 10/10 (Exceptional!!)

  4. Mico Laas from Netherlands
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    This is not going to be one of those long reviews, consisting ofdetailed writings about what was good or wrong, that is for you todecide, once it hits the cinemas. All i am saying to you, is that youshould definitely find some time and read the book before you go andsee the movie. Book is very complex, sometimes hard to keep up with,but has a bit more ambient depth into it, while the movie offers youall the eye-candy that even your imagination wouldn't be able toconjure. The movie is pretty, well acted and has a good script, thatsticks to what was in the book, BUT, much less detailed (well, it is amovie, so that's normal). This movie is not enough to understandeverything behind The Hobbit and the story behind it, but it does givea nice illustrative try to simplify things.

  5. Haris Krupalija from Sarajevo, Bosnia
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    I was a mere child when I watched LOTR franchise and I still liked it.Ever since, year by year, I grew fonder and fonder of the movies andthey remain, and probably forever will, one of my favorite movies ofall time. I've read all the books countless times (including Hobit) andwhen I saw that Hobbit was coming into the cinema, my mind was entirelywiped away from its existence due to excitement that entered me.

    Now, movie review.

    As expected from Peter – almost flawless masterpiece. Given that he hada lot of material to work with, I imagine it was quite hard to puteverything together for the scenery – yet he did it, once more. Hecaptured the feeling of the book and transcended it onto a screen; ofcourse, it was not solely his credit, to not be mistaken. The actingwas amazing – perfectly fitting into fantasy style. The chemistrybetween actors was more than just the obvious – you could actually feeltheir interactions and live the story. Yes, it was that good.

    I have no need to begin writing about camera work and all that comeswith it; locations were beautiful, effects and colors were mixedperfect, a soundtrack that followed through pattered with what wasgoing on perfectly … it is really one of those moments when yousimply can't say enough because you know, regardless of how many wordsyou put in, you still won't be able to describe things the way you feltthem. I have only one thing to say: congratulations Mr. Jackson andrest of the cast.

    The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey will become classic without anydoubt; I am just glad that I got to be a part of the generation thatwitnessed the never-dying franchise of Mr. Tolkien's work.

  6. Dan Franzen (dfranzen70) from United States
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    A shortish book is drawn out to not one but three full-length featurefilms, the better to flesh out characters who need, uh, fleshing, andthe better to tell every bit of the tale. This is the story of BilboBaggins, who makes his first appearance as a young lad in PeterJackson's The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

    If I could use just one word to describe the film, it would be "wow."Or maybe "gosh" or "gee" or "holy COW"…but those are two words, and Iam digressing. The movie is in 3D and will also be available in IMAX. Isaw it in 3D. It's worth it in 3D. It's a beautiful, stunning film thatfeels right in line with the earlier Lord of the Rings movies, eventhough it's set 60 years earlier and derives from what's best describedas a children's book.

    Bilbo (Martin Freeman) is a hobbit. Hobbits are smaller than you andme. Well, you, anyway. They're short. They live simple lives, and theylove it. Theirs is an agrarian society. No magic, no oddities, andabove all no adventures. And such is the case with Mr. Baggins, wholives in a home called Bag's End in an area known as The Shire. He iscontent. Until the mysterious wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellan) appearssuddenly, as is his wont, and offers Bilbo a chance at a grandadventure indeed. It involves several dwarfs who wish to trek back totheir homeland, which has been usurped by a huge dragon named Smaug,and reclaim it as their own. I know, it sounds simple and that Bilbomight be slumming by tagging along, but off he goes anyway.Reluctantly.

    Now, please bear in mind that, like the LOTR movies, this is just thefirst of three films. The entire Hobbit story isn't told. That means wespend more time in certain areas than we might have if the book hadbeen filmed in one shot. The unsightly squad, with their faux burglar(Bilbo) run into comical stone giants and put on a rotating spit, thenbeset by orcs and goblins, and then at some point, deep within thegoblins' mountain, Bilbo runs into a familiar (to us) face: Gollum,nee' Smeagol, the keeper of the One Ring.

    Much of the movie, with New Zealand stepping in admirably again forMiddle-Earth, involves the troupe running from things. Running acrossfields, down into caves, through caverns, across more fields, up anddown mountains, and so on. Lots of running. Considering most of thesedwarfs are built like beer kegs and not Kenyan runners, I'm kind ofsurprised none of them suffer a cardiac arrest or two. But again,digression.

    And much of the plot, aside from the standard journey to a farawayland, involves the development of Bilbo as, well, a man. Hobbit,whatever. He's meek and mild, but he finds his courage, several timesover, through the course of just this film. The gleaming sword given tohim by Gandalf helps a mite, too. But still! Cunning and courage andwhatnot from a lowly hobbit! (Literally lowly.)

    You will see some familiar faces. Let's just say that Rivendell is onthe way, just as it was/will be in the first LOTR movie. There takesplace a debate about whether the dwarfs, led by the great ThorinOakenshield, really should be doing what they're doing. Saruman theWhite is pretty set against it, but Lady Galadriel seems to trustGandalf more than anyone. And so our dwarfs run from place to place,lopping off orc heads as they go. It's pretty neat.

    Is this a movie for kids, though? It's based on a kids-like book that'smuch lighter than the LOTR stuff to follow. And it is PG-13, of course.But it's not a family film in the sense that, oh, The Polar Express is.It can be scary at times, and the 3D – well used – heightens that. Thedwarfs are great comic relief, but they don't dull the edge of a quick-paced, very well shot film. The youngest shouldn't be in the theater,but it's suitable for the tweens and above. With plenty of great actionfor the rest of us, too.

  7. Stephen Cook from United States
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey brings back the magic of MiddleEarth, but I think it's unfortunate that it will experience theinevitable comparison to The Lord of the Rings trilogy — because it'sa very different kind of work, a different kind of tale, a differentkind of atmosphere, a different kind of story progression with adifferent kind of flow. LOTR fans rushing in just to get another tasteof the original films may be disappointed. There is certainly no lessintensity, though the scale of the adventure is not quite as large. Thechange in moods between comical Dwarf mischief and dark, violentbattles is a bit jarring. The soundtrack I am sad to say is ratherfamiliar and wholly unimpressive. The pacing suffers some fromJackson's decision to spread the story into three parts; the movieseems to trace a disjoint set of drawn-out events along Bilbo'sjourney. They don't seem to be using human actors anymore fororcs/goblins, and it shows in some scenes where the CGI is spotty. Andyet through it all, I never wanted it to end.

    Even nearing its exhausting 2 and a half hours, I kept hoping thecredits would never roll. It's a fascinating, exhilarating, andhilarious ride from start to finish. Not the same kind of film as LOTR,but epic in its own right. The acting was pitch-perfect, especiallyfrom Martin Freeman as Bilbo and Richard Armitage as Thorin. Thebattles were exciting and fast- paced. To my great surprise and relief,the 3D and 48fps played out quite nicely and did not detract from thefootage. And my favorite part of course was Gollum's return to thescreen. Bilbo's riddle battle with Gollum was possibly the mostdelightfully intense scene in the movie.

    The theater was filled with "awwwwww's" when the credits hit, and soI'm sure every satisfied viewer will be back in their seats next yeareagerly awaiting the second installment of The Hobbit. Congrats, PeterJackson & Co. continue to dish out the best in the fantasy genre.8.5/10

  8. natygance from Argentina
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    This movie was so EPIC i'm speechless. I went with high expectationsbecause Peter Jackson is awesome, but man, they weren't high ENOUGH. Icouldn't see any flaw in this movie at all, they do change the way someevents happened, but they're details and don't really change the story,actually you can tell they were needed.Jackson also adds someinformation, but he did say beforehand that he would, and is taken fromother Tolkien stories, and as I haven't read them, I was very happywith the change because they were things I didn't know. The way themovie starts is very clever, and the whole introduction before thejourney is almost exactly like the book, which I enjoyed very much. Thefights scenes, just exactly as LOTR are INCREDIBLE,very well done, andwith some funny moments as well. The cast is flawless, I think everyactor portrays their character to perfection, I was happy with all theacting choices. The part of the book they picked to end the movie wasgreat, the book though is basically divided into three main events, soit was somewhat predictable, but the scene they made to end the moviewas perfect!!. So Basically if you're a Tolkien fan, or justLOTR-Hobbit fan you'll be puking rainbows of epicness throughout themovie.I had the luck to go to the premiere, but i'm obviously gonna gowatch it again on IMAX.

  9. Munin75 from France
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    First of all, let me first say that while I enjoyed the LOTR trilogy,and admired the directorial and technical greatness of it, I'm no LOTRfanboy, and I also recognize its flaws. I'm saying this so that oneunderstands that I'm not the type of person who will blindly speakgreatly of any film of the Tolkien/Jackson series if I don't feel itdeserves it.

    This being said, I have difficulties understanding some of the negativeprofessional reviews which said The Hobbit is a failed attempt, and notas good as LOTR. The artistic and directing style are exactly the same(so I won't comment on this more). I also wasn't expecting to like the48 fps since I'm the kind of guy who squints even at high definitionTVs, but surprisingly, I thought it looked great in The Hobbit, and Ithink 48 fps is the future. There are slow moments in The Hobbit,broken regularly by excitingly over the top action scenes. Again, justlike LOTR – so I don't see why one would like the original trilogy andnot The Hobbit.

    The Hobbit is perhaps a little less dark in tone than LOTR, consideringthe source material which is more of a children's book, but it'sclearly not a children's movie anyway, and displays many exciting andstressful moments. It also offers something more than the LOTR, that isfive genuinely important villains right then and there. The dragonSmaug, in this first film, is like Sauron in the LOTR. A distant,mysterious figure who is the ultimate goal of the quest, whom we don'tsee much of yet, but we know it's going to be brutal. The "necromancer"is mostly alluded. Those who know the book will know who that is, andhe'll surely be important in the sequels. Azog, the giant orc, is amain villain and is much more appealing than the Uruk-hai chief inFellowship of the Ring, or any other orc villain in the LOTR series.The Goblin King also has a strong key role in the movie. And of course,Gollum, who's riddle scene with Bilbo is fantastic.

    Martin Freeman as Bilbo is superb and there couldn't be a betterchoice. The rest of the cast is pitch perfect as well. While the 13dwarfs are too many for us to get to know each and every one of themwell enough by the end of this first movie, I didn't feel it was adowner. We got to know at least a third sufficiently – and I'm surewe'll get to learn about and appreciate the rest in the subsequentfilms – this allows us to still have characters to discover later on.

    Anyway, great film. I think it's better than Fellowship, and I'll beseeing it again for sure and can't wait for the sequels.

  10. mark yates from United Kingdom
    14 Dec 2012, 1:53 am

    No spoilers! Yes the film is long – 11 minutes shy of 3 hours notincluding credits, and feels longer than the Fellowship of the Rings. Ifind the digital/camera + 3D that Jackson is using far more distractingthan any 48fps (as it was a critic preview in Leicster Square and I wasthere as guest of a writer). The film looks too sharp,clean and brighta lot of the time. Jackson also likes to keep his camera moving and panpast things in the immediate foreground, a persons shoulder, branchesin a tree, and in 3D this is just jarring and distracting. It's notlike an early 3D movie where they throw things at the camera but it'snearly that bad. The subtitles (used a few times during some of the elfscenes) also are distractingly floaty. Fire and any birds also don'tseem to work so well in the 3D space. This is a problem of the 3D andthe strength of the stereo picture generated (in a documentary theyshow that it is continuously adjustable by moving the 2 cameras). Ihave no real issue with the 48fps. I don't like the stuttering effectof a panning camera and at 48fps this is a non-issue. I think thefilm-makers don't have the experience to do 3D well unlike say Avatarwhere it was subtle and immersive. Now for the digital toolbox. Many ofyou might have seen King Kong, Indy 4 or Phantom Menace. Here Jacksonmakes the same mis-steps he does on King Kong, using digital charactersto do one unbelievable thing after another. In that it was have humansrunning in the feet of dinosaurs, then falling through a chasm of vineschased by dinosaurs while not falling off a log despite it being shakenlike a dog with a stick. Here we have Hobbit+dwarfs on the side of amoving mountain pointlessly involved in a battle (they're on themountains legs) and a bridge falling down a chasm with dwarfs hangingoff it. Jackson please stop these super-human digital characters doingthis rubbish. It's unbelievable and destroys suspension-of-disbeliefcompletely! The bunny sled racing through the forst – OK, I can buythat – but not it doing 100mph across grassland and not disturbing thegrass… it just looked like bad special effects shots because youdidn't believe it could go so fast and didn't interact with it'senvironemnt… and didn't work in the story. My next niggle (spoilerahead) is with Jackson's pointless story changes. Bilbo does not losethe brass buttons escaping through a door-way and later becomes a herowhen he shouldn't be. Kili and Fili would be the first to charge into afight to protect their leader/Thorin. Bilbo is not supposed to be seenas a hero until after the spiders and after the barrel escape in whatwill be much later in film 2. Other critics have commented on the slowpace, I don't mind this, the book has it's slow scenes. And Galadriel,Gandalf and the council – it's slow, but the acting is good and I likethe characters. Freeman as Bilbo is likable, the dwarfs are good funtoo and Gandalf and Gollum are amazing as usual. The Hobbit generallyfollows a path similar to the Fellowhip's course. 10 minutes ofhistory/narration, bag-end and then a journey.

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